Students Gain Work Experience Outside of Class

Malvika Mahendhra, Editor-in-Chief

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Tests. Quizzes. Essays. These are words that cram into a student’s planner with accompanying due dates. The frantic stress of getting assignments completed on time causes those sleepless nights and often zombie-like stares of students. While trying to maintain a busy schedule of academics and other extracurriculars, there are some students who even manage a job.

“I work at Campisis’ Restaurant,” senior Kyle Dixon said. “When I started working there I was 15 and was just looking for a job. Campisis’ had just opened a location near where I was living, so I applied for a job and have been there ever since. I am currently a cashier, but I have also worked as a food runner and server.”

While some students engage in more customer-service oriented jobs, others participate in assistory occupations.

“I currently work at Skin M.D. and Beyond, which is a cosmetic dermatology office,” senior Danya Aldhahir said. “This job involves a variety of different tasks that all fit under the general title ‘Personal Assistant.’ From dealing with bank statements and payroll to putting up Christmas decorations around the office, I essentially am my boss’ right hand.”

Others prefer an environment similar to school, where they have the opportunity to interact with children through learning.

“I decided to get a job at Explore Horizons as a tutor because I have always loved teaching,” senior Anushka Gadodia said. “I knew this job would give me the happiness and satisfaction I was looking for.”

While students gain knowledge through attending school, they gain real-life skills by attending their jobs.

“A lot of the skills I have learned while working have been customer-service based,” Dixon said. “Interacting with strangers in a professional way is an important life skill in my opinion and I am glad I learned it at such as young age.”

Some occupations even allow students to become exposed to financial knowledge, which is often seldom discussed in classrooms.

“Before being hired, I knew nothing about dealing with bank statements, payroll and credit card statements,” Aldhahir said. “Dealing with these financial tasks is the majority of what I am tasked with, so within the first couple of months of working here, I quickly became adjusted to it and have even become fast and efficient in it.”

Other lessons students have learned is creating a better sense of leadership and responsibility.

“I have learned that it is extremely important for me to establish a sense of trust and credibility between me and the parents,” Gadodia said. “Parents leave their child in my hand to help build the base to their future.”

However, having a job while being a full-time student can be difficult to coordinate on a schedule filled with extracurriculars.

“The most difficult aspect of working while also being a student is being able to manage my time wisely,” Gadodia said. “I normally go home from school and then immediately leave for work and come back home in the night. Sometimes, I am extremely exhausted from work and decide to go to bed instead of completing my homework or studying for a test the next day.”

Despite the tight scheduling having a job may impose, these students are grateful for the lessons their job has taught them.

“I would recommend that high school students get a job,” Aldhahir said. “It definitely teaches them to be responsible with their spending and also encourages independence and maturity, which are essential especially as college is just around the corner.”

For Dixon and Gadodia their occupation does not reflect their future aspirations, but gives itself to be a tangible outlet to demonstrate their skills and interests.

“Although I do not plan on becoming a tutor or a teacher in the future, my job does somewhat reflect what I want to do in the future,” Gadodia said. “I never want to stop spreading knowledge and never want to stop learning. I want to continue to be asked questions that trigger higher levels of deep thinking whether that comes from a 5 year-old kid or a 40 year-old adult.”

Yet for Aldhahir, this job is a physical envision of what she plans her future to be.

“My current job reflects what I want to do in the future,” Aldhahir said. “I see myself working in a private medical office when I end up working in the healthcare sector.”

Through their jobs, they have gotten the opportunity to meet new people outside of school.

“Some of the most memorable parts of working where I work are the people I have met,” Dixon said. “Many of my co-workers have become good friends of mine and that is something I genuinely appreciate.”

Most importantly, their job has led to a creation of life-long memories and treasured encounters.

“I think the most important moment to me was on my second day of work,” Gadodia said. “The children at my job were voting for their favorite tutor, and the girl I had just finished tutoring asked me how to spell my name. At first I was unaware as to why she wanted to know how to spell my name, but later she came and whispered to me ‘I voted for you as my favorite tutor because you taught me division and you are so nice.’ Her words left a huge impact on me as I felt a sense of happiness and that motivated me to want to go to work even more.”

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About the Writer
Malvika Mahendhra, Editor-in-Chief

Malvika Mahendhra is currently a senior, and is excited to be Editor-in-Chief for the BluePrints. She plans to major in English in college and hopes to...

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Students Gain Work Experience Outside of Class